Fritillaries and butterflies

Kim’s notes: From Viola sagittata notes. From Viola adunca notes From Viola pedatifida notes (restoring of butterfly species)   In relation to Viola adunca Reference: www.npwrc.usgs.gov USGS Butterflies of America Aphrodite Fritillary (Speyeria aphrodite [Fabricius]) Wing span: 2 1/2 – 3 1/4 inches (6.3 – 8.3 cm). Identification: Geographically variable. Upperside reddish orange-brown; male forewing with…

Viola adunca

Viola adunca Kim’s notes, unedited. Illustrations: 11 photographs of Viola adunca and varieties, 4 drawings of Viola adunca Viola adunca Smith J.E. Smith in Rees Cyclopaedia 37:63, 1817. Type: ‘west coast of North America’, collected by Archibald Menzies. Sect. Viola subsect. Rostratae Holmgren: section Rostellatae Boiss, subsection Rosulantes Borbas. According to Clausen (1964), the subsection…

Viola bicolor

Viola bicolor Pursh Description and Illustrations: 9 photographs and 2 drawings of Viola bicolor Viola bicolor is unique because it is the only pansy that produces cleistogamous seed pods. A biennial species found throughout the southeast states, it is also the only pansy endemic to North America. Although there are two additional pansy species growing…

Viola renifolia

Viola renifolia A. Gray Description and illustrations: 2 photographs and 2 drawings of Viola renifolia Viola renifolia is a boreal North American species. The absence of stolons and the spreading wide kidney-shaped leaves with wavy margins will distinguish this species from other white stemless violets. It does not occur in large colonies but as scattered…

Viola primulifolia L.

Viola primulifolia L. Description and illustrations: 4 photographs of Viola primulifolia and hybrids, 4 drawings of Viola primulifolia The distinctive leaf shape and wide margins at the top of the petiole separate this species from all other white stemless violets. Leaf blades are longer than wide, ovate-oblong shape, rounded or acute at the tip; the…

Viola palustris var. brevipes

Viola palustris var. brevipes (M.S. Baker) Davis Description and illustrations: 4 photographs of Viola palustris var brevipes and 2 drawings of Viola palustris var brevipes  A smaller plant than the Viola sp. nov. populations of the Pacific northwest and Viola palustris L. var. palustris of the Atlantic. It is stoloniferous, with bright green kidney-shaped or heart shaped…

Viola palustris L.

Viola palustris L. Marsh violet. Description and illustrations: 1 photograph of Viola palustris and 3 drawings of V. palustris Though this violet is common in northern Europe, it is restricted to a small area of far northeastern North America. Its leaves are grayish-green, from creeping rhizomes and with round-faced flowers of a pink-mauve color that…

Viola palustris group, introduction. Northwestern Viola sp. nov.

Viola palustris group introduction Description and illustrations of Viola palustris group: 6 photographs and 4 drawings]  Viola palustris has been a confusing puzzle in North America for most of the last century, though not drawing much attention because most of its distribution is in relatively remote areas and occurrences are uncommon. Three races occur in…

Viola pallens

Viola pallens (Banks ex DC.) Brainerd Description and illustrations of Viola pallens: 4 photographs and 2 drawings Viola pallens is the smallest flowered of the stemless stoloniferous white violet species. It occurs in eastern North America in wetter, colder and/or higher altitude situations than V. blanda. Flowers appear early, before leaves appear on deciduous forest…

Viola occidentalis

Viola occidentalis (Gray) Howell Description and illustrations of Viola occidentalis: 3 photographs and 2 drawings This rare wetland violet has a very limited range in the Klamath-Siskiyou mountains of northwestern California and southwestern Oregon.   The characteristic leaves and limited range of V. occidentalis make it unmistakable. The stemless plants are glabrous throughout, from 8 to19…